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was formed by this constant re-reading and reimagining other people's ideas. >> steven johnson is our guest next sunday on in death. he is looking at computer networking and politics. live at noon eastern on c-span2. >> host: joining us now is author diana furchtgott-roth and she has, in fact, several new books coming out in the summer of 2012. this is a small little book put out by encounter. "how obama's gender policies undermine america" first of all, diana furchtgott-roth, what is this supposed to represent. >> guest: is a short and easily red booklet. this one is about gender policy. >> host: another new book put out by american enterprise institute is "women's figures". >> guest: that is meant for the playboy crowd. [laughter] >> host: this is the book "women's figures: an illustrated guide to the economic progress of women in america." i think some of the ideas are the same in both of these. which is compared with men, women in 21st century america live five years longer, facing unemployment rates that are significantly lower, are awarded a larger share of high school diplomas, bas a
and president ford nominated john paul stevens to replace him in the confirmation hearing he wasn't asked a question because it wasn't a part of the political dialogue in a way that it later became. the big issue, the big change began in 1980 with the election of ronald reagan because he brought with him to washington a very underrated figure in the recent history, some i don't think this is due as an important area and that is edwin meese because he was first an advisor and then as attorney general said look, they're has been a liberal agenda at the supreme court of their needs to be a conservative agenda at the supreme court. what was the agenda? expand executive power and attend to a system for americans from a speech that execution, welcome religion into the public sphere and above all, reverse roe v wade in the last months again to the abortion. a big part of the revolution was the arrival in washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted it to work on behalf of the agenda. word the best and brightest in your group? john roberts and samuel alito. in 1985
douglas stepped out and forward dominic john paul stevens to replace them. in his hearing he was not asked a single question about abortion because he was not part of a political dialogue in the way that later became. the big issue, big change began in 198 1980 that goes with the election of ronald reagan ronald reagan brought with them to washington a very underrated figure in a recent american history, somehow i don't think gets his due as an important person. that's edwin meese because edwin meese at first was in flash and then attorney general. said look, there has been a liberal agenda at the supreme court. there needs to be a conservative agenda at the supreme court. what was that agenda? expand executive power and end racial preferences, speed up execution, welcome religion into the public sphere, and above all, reverse roe v. wade and allow states once again to ban abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution was the arrival of washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted to work in that, on behalf of that agenda, who were two of the best and the br
for religion. right now as you may know, justice stevens retired two years ago as a protestant on the supreme court and we now have the supreme court of six catholics and three jews. how does that happen? in some ways you could suggest that it happens but it certainly reflects is we don't see that much anymore about the accounting by religion we still force are very aware of race and ethnicity and gender, so the fact that there are now three women on the court, you know, that says something. that's approaching a kind of normalization of the notion that the women can rise to the highest ranks in the legal profession. i think we're still waiting for more diversity in the court, and race and ethnicity. but the point i actually want to make the wingback to how the court knows what it knows is until elena kagan succeeded justice stevens two years ago she had never been a judge. she came from the dean's office at harvard law school. every member of the supreme court for the first time in our history had as the last thing on their resume a seat on the federal court of appeals, and that is astonishin
] joining us live is steven carter, and he is the author among many other most ofs we have the author the." impeachment of abraham lincoln, a novel. get thereto premises that are historically inaccurate. abraham lincoln survives thepean assassination attempt and he is impeached. where do come up with this? >> i make it clear that i am a fan. it is not an argument for the impeachment but it is a novel.tion interested in presidentialf linn power the question suggest politica itself what with his political enemies that were looking for a way to get out of the way what if it is through the impeachment process? did >> when did it occur to youg to? this might be a fun thing to do? >> i remember in college rrect? following might professors t asking what would happen if. c i had to pursue it selected the court -- courtroom drama is heonomies the?to t >> it is not easy to write but it did fit into my interest per car ride about an the presidential power. taking those questions and ideas, we din did suspend the writ of habeas corpus and those who were criticalhow of the war for the court martial so
and serves as an editor of the yale law journal. clerking for steven briar, he joined the faculty of yale in 1985. professor is co-editor of the leading constitutional law casebook, processes of the constitutional decision making and is the author of several of the books including the constitution in criminal procedure, the bill of rights creation and reconstruction, america's constitution and was really america's and written constitution, the precedents and principles will apply. the hon. clarence thomas has served as a justice of the supreme court for nearly 21 years. he attended seminary and received an ab from the college of the holy cross and j.d. from yale law school. serve as an assistant attorney general of missouri from 1974 to 1977. legislative assistant to senator john denver from 1979 to 81. from 81-82 he served as assistant secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and is chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals in district of columbia circuit and 1990 and president bush nominated
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6